Masterworks III

Masterworks III

February 19, 2016
8:00 PM | Capitol Theater | Overture Center for the Arts
Guest Artist, Dionne Jackson, flute

Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 and Nielsen's Flute Concerto make a great pairing on this program featuring the flute. Recently appointed to the faculty at the University of Connecticut, Dionne Jackson returns after making her debut in 2000. Based upon lute music from the sixteenth century, Respighi's Ancient Airs and Dances Suite No. 1 is a beautifully crafted work for chamber orchestra. We conclude with Haydn's Symphony No. 79 in F, and a riveting finale.


BACH  |  Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major
NIELSEN  |  Flute Concerto
RESPIGHI |  Ancient Airs and Dances Suite No. 1
HAYDN  |  Symphony No. 79 in F major




“Sewell knows how to pick a soloist.  Flutist Dionne Hansen wowed the crowd with lovely tone and a virtuosic technique that never left her breathless-even though the audience gasped audibly during a particularly difficult run of rapid notes in a third movement cadenza.  She helped make the Ibert, which exuded a jazzy and Ravel-like mix of lyricism and tartness the highpoint of the evening….”

- Review of Ibert Concerto by Jacob Stockinger, The Capital Times, Madison, WI

"Professor Dionne Jackson is a truly inspiring artist. Having graduated from the Juilliard School and the Paris Conservatory, and having achieved a successful career as an orchestral musician, chamber musician, soloist, and mentor, she has all the tools a student needs in order to blossom into the best artist he/she could be."

- Rolando Hernandez (Costa Rica) MM 2013


A native of Chicago, IL, Ms. Jackson started her professional career as second flute of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra. The following summer she was invited by the legendary Julius Baker to attend Juilliard on a full scholarship and was selected as a Morse Fellow. While still a student, she played substitute flute in the New York Philharmonic. The following year, she was accepted into the Civic Orchestra of Chicago and became active on the new music scene with MusicNow, Chicago’s innovative new music series. While performing with MusicNow, she had the honor of playing Pierre Boulez’s Sonatine for Flute and Piano for Mr. Boulez himself. Subsequently, she wrote an article analyzing the work which was published in Flute Talk Magazine. In 2000, she won her position as Assistant Principal Flute with the Chicago Lyric Opera. She became a frequent guest artist of The Chicago Chamber Musicians playing newly commissioned works, outreach concerts, and live recordings which can be heard on In 2008-2009, she held a one-year position as Associate Principal Flute of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Her season engagements included tours to Asia and Carnegie Hall performing with world-renowned conductors Bernard Haitink and Pierre Boulez. Additionally, she has recently been featured numerous times as a soloist on Chicago Classical Radio Station WFMT 98.7.

A winner of numerous awards and competitions, Ms. Jackson won first prizes in Chicago’s Union League Competition, Musicians Club of Women, Chamber Players Young Artists’, Artists International (NY), and Flute Talk. She received fellowships from the Tanglewood Music Center, Aspen Music School, Harriet Hale Woolley Grant ($10,000) and a Fulbright Grant.

During her studies, Ms. Jackson was the first American flutist in over a decade to win the prestigious First Prize in Flute from the Paris Conservatory of Music (CNSMP). She also received a First Prize in Chamber Music as well. While in France, at the invitation of the American Cultural Commission, she performed solo recitals in Nice, Tours, Toulouse, Monte-Carlo, Bordeaux, Marseille, and Paris.

Professor Jackson holds degrees from The Juilliard School (B.M.), The Paris Conservatory (1st Prize), and Indiana University (B.M. and Performer’s Certificate). Her primary teachers were Julius Baker, Sandra Church, Alain Marion, Raymond Guiot, Peter Lloyd, and Don Peck.


Season Ticket Subscriptions Seating Chart Pre-concert Dinners
“Phenomenal flute soloist Dionne Hansen drew well-deserved cheers, and the three-hour two-intermission program inspired, and earned, a six-minute standing ovation...”
-Chicago Sun Times